How a movie director’s film saved his life and became an icon for a generation of filmmakers

A Hollywood film director’s life is a cautionary tale about the dangers of the film business.

His name is Roger Ebert.

The 61-year-old has become a legend in his own right, with his films and books spawning sequels, spinoffs and television series.

Ebert was one of the first film directors to embrace technology and the digital revolution, and he became an outspoken critic of Hollywood’s film-making practices.

But for many, his legacy is also a caution, a caution for aspiring filmmakers to be careful in the business of filmmaking.

Eberts life and career started with a dream in 1974.

His father, a doctor who had served in the Navy during World War II, left the family when he was a teenager and went to work for the U.S. Department of Defense.

It was there that Ebert began to work on his own film, a film about the war effort.

His work was the subject of several books, including “The Biggest Loser,” which won a Golden Globe for Best Picture in 1981 and “Lincoln.”

Ebert’s first film, “The War,” debuted in 1984 and became a cultural phenomenon, grossing $1.5 billion worldwide.

That year, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced it would honor the film with its annual film festival, which honored movies that had been “unexpectedly nominated for an Oscar.”

Eberths first film was also the subject to a lawsuit from the U, but the director prevailed, winning a victory that was later upheld by a federal appeals court.

EBERT IS A HERO By the time Ebert died, he had become a Hollywood icon.

His films had been nominated for three Academy Awards and he was awarded a second for Best Original Screenplay in 1996.

In 2001, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

He died in 2004, but his work lives on.

In the decades since his death, many film directors have been inspired by Ebert and others in his tradition.

The movie “Hail Mary,” the film about a woman who gets married to her best friend’s son, has become an iconic piece of Americana, and “The Wedding Singer” is one of Eberts best known films.

But Ebert is not the only film director whose work inspired film-makers.

The work of other film directors, particularly those whose work had a dramatic impact on the way film was made, have become more important in recent years.

Eisner and others like him have become influential in a film industry that has increasingly embraced digital filmmaking techniques.

And that’s why we have a movie that’s been nominated three times for an Academy Award for Best Film Editing: “Hails From the Crypt.”

And it’s not just a movie.

We’ve had a few other nominees in that category, too.

But the Oscars have not recognized that film in that way since 1988, when the Academy Award went to the musical comedy “The Wizard of Oz.”

The story of Dorothy Gale, a magical, eccentric young woman, was adapted into a musical.

In its original version, Dorothy was a tomboy.

She was married off at the age of 12 to a man she never met.

Her parents tried to keep her from seeing her son, who died at the end of the play.

In his tribute to Ebert, “Hits and Misses” actor Jeff Bridges said that he would like to see his own films nominated for Best Editing, but that he thinks Ebert “was the only person who could do it.”

He said that the film’s visual effects were brilliant, and that the story of the character Dorothy is “so funny and tragic.”

EBERTS CAREER IS NOT THE ONLY ONE To say that Ebert’s career is not over would be an understatement.

Ebers career as a film director is more than two decades long, and it spans more than 50 films.

That’s a long way from the early 1970s, when Eberitz began his film career as an assistant to Robert Altman, the writer and director of “The Godfather,” a movie about mobsters and the mob.

Ebeys first film came out in 1977, when he and Altman made a short-lived series called “The Red Scare,” which was about a gangster who goes into hiding.

Eborts next film, the 1987 film “The Great Escape,” was based on a book by the same name.

And his last film, 1989’s “The Road to Perdition,” was directed by John Milius, who went on to direct such classics as “Empire Strikes Back,” “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes,” “Star Wars: Episode IV, A New Hope,” and “Star Trek: Into Darkness.”

He was later replaced by Paul Schrader, a friend of Ebertzs, as executive producer of “Halls of Stardom,” the first